TOZANDO KATANA SHOP

Yasurime: A point that should not be overlooked when appraising swords

Yasurime: A point that should not be overlooked when appraising swords

What is Yasurime?

Yasurime is a rasp applied to the hiraji and shinogiji of a sword's tang to prevent it from slipping off the tsuka handle. Ancient swords had marks that looked as if they had been simply hammered out, but as time went by, this area also began to attract more attention, and since the Edo period (1603-1867), decorative filing, or kesho yasuri, were increasingly popular. The thickness, direction, and angle of the rasp vary depending on the school, swordsmith, and period, making it an important point in sword appraisal.

Sensuki

Sensuki Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

This is a mark made by shaping the tang with a plane called a "sen" and is often seen on swords and spears of the Jokoto period. In later periods, when a coarse file was applied vertically as a reissue of the Koto period, it is also called a sensuki.

Kiri-yasuri

Kiri-yasuri Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

This is also called yoko-yasuri, in which the rasp is applied horizontally. It is a rule in the sword world to apply this Kiri-yasuri to the area after the sword has been shortened(suriage).

Katte-sagari-yasuri

Katte-sagari Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

Katte-sagari-yasuri is a style of filing downward to the right. Katte means right and sagari means downward.

Katte-agari-yasuri

Katte-agari Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

A file upward to the right is called a katte-agari yasuri. Agari means upward. Left-handed swordsmiths tend to use this type of file.

Sujikai-yasuri

Sujikai Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

A more steeply angled katte-sagari-yasuri.

Saka-suijikai-yasuri

A more steeply angled katte-agari-yasuri.

Saka-sujikai Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

O-sujikai-yasuri

O-sujikai Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

A file with a steeper slope than sujikai-yasuri.

Takanoha-yasuri

Takanoha Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

This name comes from the fact that the file looks like a hawk's wings. Yamato and Mino school swordsmiths favored this type of file.

Higaki-yasuri

Higaki Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

A style with many lines crossing each other diagonally to form a wicker fence pattern. Yamato and Mino school swordsmiths favored this type of file.

Kesho-yasuri

Kesho Yasurime of Japanese sword katana

This was applied after the Edo period (1603-1868) to further enhance the aesthetics of the tang and is found only on swords of the Shinto and Shinshinto periods. This technique was further developed into the highly decorative style like the kozutsum-yasuri.